Why Clinton Shouldn’t Blame Women For Her Election Loss

by Karin Agness

Hillary Clinton was the first woman to win one of the major party nominations for President of the United States. There are many positive lessons she could teach women candidates and women who aspire to run—it’s too bad that she is instead spending her time accusing women voters of being weak, and effectively discouraging other women from trying to run.

Read More


Ivanka Backs White House Plan To Pause Obama-Era Equal Pay Reporting

by Karin Agness

The White House announced this week that it won’t move forward with an Obama Administration rule requiring businesses to collect and report employee pay data by sex, race and ethnicity.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Neomi Rao, the administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs said, “It’s enormously burdensome. We don’t believe it would actually help us gather information about wage and employment discrimination.”

Read More


What Women Want 97 Years After Winning The Right To Vote

by Karin Agness

Friday marks the anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, in 1920.

Unlike many women around the world, American women have a voice in politics and policy. Women throughout the nation are influencing legislation, helping hold leaders accountable, and running for office, including to be President of the United States.

Read More


New Position Will Fundamentally Change The Experience Of Men At Princeton

by Karin Agness

What does it mean to be a Princeton man? Regardless of how you might answer that question today, it will be drastically changing in the near future if Princeton University has anything to say about it.

Princeton is the latest university to provide specific programming to try to change men on campus, and is currently looking to hire an “Interpersonal Violence Clinician and Men’s Engagement Manager.” In addition to providing clinical support for the men at Princeton, “[t]he Manager will develop and implement men’s programming initiatives geared toward enhancing awareness and challenging gender stereotypes…”

Read More


Excluding Conservatives From Female Empowerment Campaigns Is Bad Politics And Bad Business

by Karin Agness

GoldieBlox, a company promoting engineering as a career to young girls, launched a new #BeLikeHer campaign today. The hashtag campaign celebrates female role models in sports, politics and STEM fields, and encourages participants to post a photo with a sign naming their favorite female role model above the hashtag.

This sounds like a positive, uplifting campaign that we could all get behind.

But the first image in the 2 minute 35 second video is a re-creation of the Women’s March with young girls wearing pink pussy hats and holding signs that say, “A Woman’s Place Is In The Revolution,” “She Persisted,” and “Resister!”

Read More


Why To Read Beyond The Headlines On Equal Pay And The White House

by Karin Agness

Breaking news from CNN: White House women earn less than their male coworkers. The news, to many, lends more evidence to the theory of the gender wage gap—that women face widespread discrimination in the workplace and get paid less just because they are women. As usual with the equal pay issue, the headline presents a much starker picture for women than is actually the case.

According to the article headlined, “White House pays women 80 cents for every dollar paid to men,” CNN found that, “[w]omen working in the White House earn an average salary of 80 cents for every dollar paid to their male colleagues.” While the average salary among men is about $104,000, the average salary among women is only approximately $83,000.

Read More



New Report: Women CEOs Make More Than Men

by Karin Agness

Americans are used to headline after headline about the gender pay gap when it shows men earn more, on average, than women. Feminists have even created a holiday for it—Equal Pay Day—to supposedly mark how far women must work into the next year to make up for the difference in what men earned in the previous year.

But what happens when it is reversed?

Comparing median compensation packages of S&P 500 leaders who held the job for a year, 21 female CEOs received a median of $13.8 million compared to the $11.6 million median earned by the 382 male CEOs last year. This isn’t new—women CEOs have made more than men in six of the past seven years. And three of the 10 highest paid executives are women.

Read More